fbpx Skip to main content

The average adult gets two or three colds a year, but there’s plenty you can do to reduce your risk.

Reduce stress levels

Chronic high stress levels have been shown to impair immune cell defences, making us more susceptible to infections. Consider taking a holiday and resting if you find that you’re recurrently sick.

Sleep well

Poor sleep quality and lack of sleep is linked to increased susceptibility to the common cold as the stress it places on the body impairs immune function.

Increase zinc and vitamin C

These nutrients facilitate immune cell function. Modern farming practices have led to a reduction in nutrients in many fruit and veg, so it’s worth taking a vitamin C supplement of up to 1000mg a day this season. Zinc is found in animal products, beans and nuts. A supplement of 25-30mg per day can help in winter.

Move more

The lung-clearing effects and raised body temperatures during exercise are thought to eliminate bugs and boost immunity. Aim for at least 30 minutes at a moderate intensity three times a week.

Boost omega-3

Omega-3 fish oil activates B-cells, which are key to long-term immunity. A supplement of quality omega-3 fish oil can help, especially if you don’t eat much nutrient-dense fish such as salmon, tuna, herring, sardines or mackerel.

Reduce sugar

Sugar can inhibit immune cell function by impairing the ability of phagocytes (white blood cells) to combat invading bacteria and viruses.

Add some herbs

The medicinal herbs turmeric, garlic and ginger have a potent antiviral and antioxidant content that helps boost the body’s immune response, so add these into your dishes when possible.

Take probiotics

A large proportion of our immune defence is in our digestive tract, and an effective immune response relies on the presence of “good bacteria”, such as lactobacillus and bifidobacterium, in our gut. This microbiota can be reduced by lifestyle, stress and medication use. Try taking a good-quality probiotic daily if you experience recurrent infections.

Try hypnosis

Various studies suggest that clinical hypnosis may be beneficial for improving our immune cell count, in particular the cells that fight viral illness. Check the Australian Hypnotherapists’ Association national register to find a qualified hypnotherapist in your area.

Consider herbal medicine

The traditional herb astragalus can help modulate immune function, while echinacea can assist in reducing the severity and duration of a cold. Other herbs such as olive leaf extract and green tea extract are yet to be properly evaluated but may have a positive effect.

Source: bodyandsoul.com.au